Giving a workshop in Jakarta

My institution, The Royal Conservatoire of Glasgow, have sent me on a trip to make connections with a number of potential partners in Indonesia, including the UPH Conservatory of Music, the Jakarta Institute of Arts (IKJ), and Institut Seni Indonesia Surakarta (ISI Solo). I’ll also be visiting Singapore to see Setan Jawa, and talk to the producers about bringing this to Glasgow for a Festival of Gamelan and the Moving Image that we are planning here for September.

Here’s the poster for a workshop I’ll be giving at UPH, that will take in a livecoding demo and a performance of Steadily-Stop! alongside an analysis of Antichthon.

Getting ready to be five (/four)

Next Friday I’m going to to be taking part in a 24 hour online algorave event wearefive to celebrate five years of the algorave movement. By accident or design I’m on back to back with co¥ᄀpt (aka Sean Cotterill) who is one of only a couple of us livecoding in pure SuperCollider, rather than the by-now overwelmingly popular TidalCycles.

Sean has been putting together an interesting set of pages on his approach to livecoding in SC, particularly on the things that need to be set up beforehand. I’ve evolved some similar ideas myself, perhaps little a less organised and more hacky. For interest, I’ve put my current setup files with comments on sccode.org and also a wee example of the kind of code I use.

Admittedly, some of this won’t make sense without the particular arrangement of samples and loops that I use. I’ve recently hit upon the idea of using an array of 32 different drum samples organised roughly in the following pattern:

00 a bass drum sound
01 hi hat
02 a snare
03 a different hi hat (or other hit)
04 a different bass drum sound
… etc

That way, I can make a basic un-ta-ka-ta beat just by stepping through all 32, or segments thereof:

Pseq(~arrayOfHits, inf)
Pseq(~arrayOfHits[4..7], inf)

I’ve also discovered some really quite good longer patterns with this layout, using Pslide:

Pslide(~arrayOfHits,inf,4,3)

Guess we’ll see how all of this sounds at the rather unravy time of 0800 GMT next Friday!

Recent livecoding in SuperCollider

Over the winter break I’ve been spending some time working on my livecoding/algorave setup in SuperCollider. Here’s a quick practice run, this is how things are going at the moment.

The most recent idea here is the \warp synth, a granulator slowly reading through a choice of soundfiles. In this particular run, I think the .choose threw up a fragment of a Stokowski Bach transcription https://archive.org/details/J.S.BACH-OrchestralTranscriptions-NEWTRANSFER and perhaps a bit of the theme tune from The IT Crowd as well. A nice background wash of sound behind the rhythmic stuff. For the latter, the samples in the first half of the video are various from here http://machines.hyperreal.org/manufacturers/ and in the second half of the run, after I exectue ~changesamples, from here http://theremin.music.uiowa.edu/MIS.html and here http://www.philharmonia.co.uk/explore/sound_samples.

The synths I’m using and my initialisation file is up on GitHub at https://github.com/tedthetrumpet/supercollider.

Layering visuals with SuperCollider

When I was at emfcamp last week, I saw a couple of instances of people layering up visuals with their code. Claudius Maximus had that going with his clive system, SonicPi (and Gibber??) can do it out of the box, and Shelly Knotts  had some sort of setup for (I think?) doing it completely within SuperCollider, with the cool idea of a webcam pointing down at her hands on the keyboard.

After a bit of thought, I’ve come up with this, just a still for now:

sclayervisuals.png

How this works: I used a $10 utility called ScreenCaptureSyphon that can amongst other things grab an application window and send it into Syphon. Then, Resolume Arena runs as a Syphon client, which lets me do almost anything including, as in the shot below, pull in the webcam and colorize. Not tried it yet, but Arena exposes its interface to OSC, so should in theory be possible to script visual changes from the SuperCollider IDE.

A reasonably concinnitous hack, if I say so myself. (MInd you, it’s the first thing I’ve ever done with my MacBook Air that turns the fan on full blast the whole time!)

Getting my fingers burned

Sooner or later, I’m going to have to get back to the ‘ol soldering iron:

 

JS_Synth-ttt01

I have a plan: to reconstruct the PE Minisonic you can see above, that I made while I was in school. I still have some of the boards…

Here’s my screen

Show us your screens! Ok, well at last maybe I’m ready. Here’s five minutes or so of me improvising in SuperCollider that’s not as embarrassing as some of my other attempts:

The code is on GitHub if anyone is madly interested.

Recording from ‘Night of the Earthmen’

Not be much to listen to, maybe, but feels an important moment for me: a new direction after finishing the PhD, satisfyingly far away from score-based contemporary ‘classical’ nonpop, or whatever you call all that stuff. Next up: more of this kind of thing, plus more gamelan. Happy days.